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Below are some facts about the American Cancer Society and breast cancer. We encourage you to include these when updating your personal fundraising page or add them to the emails you send to friends and family. These facts demonstrate the work we've accomplished together and remind us that, together, we can create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays!


The American Cancer Society

  • Having cancer is hard. Finding help shouldn't be. The American Cancer Society is available around the clock to help you through your cancer experience. We are here every minute of every day and night at 1-800-227-2345 and cancer.org.

  • The American Cancer Society combines a never-ending passion with the wisdom of nearly a century of experience to save lives by helping you stay well, helping you get well, by finding cures, and fighting back. Learn more at cancer.org.

  • One of the many ways the American Cancer Society saves lives is by finding cures through groundbreaking research. The American Cancer Society has invested more than $3.5 billion in cancer research since its research program began in 1946.

  • In 2010, an estimated 207,090 women in the United States were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer and nearly 40,000 women died from the disease. In addition, an estimated 1,970 men in the United States were diagnosed with breast cancer. Learn how to fight back at acscan.org/makingstrides.

  • More than 11 million Americans who have a history of cancer will celebrate another birthday this year. The American Cancer Society knows how special a birthday can be: a celebration of life, a marker of progress. Join us, and together we'll save more lives and help everyone celebrate more birthdays. Find out more at 1-800-227-2345 or cancer.org.

  • More than half of all cancers could be prevented. Learn how to stay well and reduce your risk of cancer by making healthy lifestyle choices at cancer.org.

  • When you support the American Cancer Society you are helping create a world with less cancer and more birthdays where people are living longer, healthier lives.

  • Having cancer is hard. Having to travel out of town for treatment can make it even harder. The American Cancer Society provides free temporary lodging (in some communities) to patients and their caregivers who must travel far from home to get quality cancer treatment at its Hope Lodge® facilities. To find out if there is a Hope Lodge® facility in your area, call your American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org/hopelodge.

  • More than 3 million volunteers help the American Cancer Society save lives in communities across the country. These dedicated people donate their time and talents to help people stay well by educating the public about taking steps to reduce their cancer risk or find it early; help people get well with hands-on support and services for patients and their loved ones through every step of a cancer experience; and fight back by rallying their communities and advocating for responsible cancer policies at the local, state, and federal levels. To learn how you can join the Society in the fight against cancer, visit cancer.org.

  • Sometimes you just need to connect with someone who has "been there." The American Cancer Society Cancer Survivors Network® is an online community for cancer survivors and their family and friends where people can connect with others who have been through the cancer experience. Women recently diagnosed with breast cancer can find one-on-one support from breast cancer survivors through the Society's Reach To Recovery´┐? program. Visit cancer.org/csn to learn more, be inspired by people's stories, and even share your own story.

  • Lack of health insurance and other barriers prevent many Americans from receiving quality health care. To learn more about what the American Cancer Society is doing to help all people have access to health care, visit cancer.org/access.

Breast Cancer/Making Strides

  • The American Cancer Society Making Strides events raise funds and awareness to fight breast cancer and provide hope to people facing the disease. With each step and dollar raised, you'll help the American Cancer Society save lives. To learn more about how you can help create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays, visit cancer.org/stridesonline or call 1-800-227-2345.

  • Dollars raised through the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer events help the American Cancer Society save lives by helping people stay well, helping people get well, by finding cures, and fighting back. To learn more about the Making Strides events and how participants are helping save lives, visit cancer.org/stridesonline.

  • Since 1993, nearly 7 million walkers have raised more than $400 million through the American Cancer Society Making Strides events. In 2010 alone, nearly 800,000 walkers across the country collected $60 million to help create a world with less breast cancer and more birthdays. To learn more about Making Strides and how the dollars raised are making a difference, visit cancer.org/stridesonline.

  • One of the ways the American Cancer Society is saving lives is by finding cures through groundbreaking research. The Society invests more in breast cancer research than in any other cancer type. Society-funded research has led to the discovery of lifesaving breast cancer treatments, including Tamoxifen and Herceptin.

  • Attention, ladies! The best defense against breast cancer is finding it early. If you are 40 or older, get a mammogram and a breast exam by a doctor or nurse every year, and always report any breast changes to your doctor without delay. Sign up for a free email mammogram reminder at cancer.org/MammogramReminder and encourage the women you love to do the same.

  • Use your voice to help ensure all women regardless of income have access to mammograms and lifesaving breast cancer treatments. Visit acscan.org/makingstrides to learn how you can fight back to help more women celebrate more birthdays.

  • Help reduce your chances of developing breast cancer by exercising regularly, maintaining a healthy weight, and limiting the amount of alcohol you drink. Learn more at cancer.org/breastcancer.

  • Want to fight back against breast cancer? Volunteer to help people facing breast cancer get well through American Cancer Society breast cancer support programs. If you are a breast cancer survivor, consider becoming a volunteer. Get trained as a Reach To Recovery´┐? volunteer to provide one-on-one support to newly diagnosed patients. Go to cancer.org to learn how you can help save lives.

  • If you know a woman who is 40 or older and is not getting her yearly mammograms because she is afraid of the test, encourage her to visit cancer.org/mammovideo to watch a video of women talking about their experiences with mammograms.

  • For more information about breast cancer, how to find it early, and to join the fight against this disease, contact your American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 or visit cancer.org/breastcancer.

  • Sometimes you need to talk with someone who has "been there." The American Cancer Society matches trained volunteers who are breast cancer survivors with women who are newly diagnosed breast cancer patients to help them get well and learn to cope with their disease while providing emotional support and information. To learn more about the Reach To Recovery´┐? program and find out how to get involved, visit cancer.org.

  • Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women (excluding skin cancer). Learn how to stay well by taking steps to reduce your risk for cancer or detect it at its earliest, most treatable stage, at cancer.org/breastcancer.

Prevention and Early Detection

  • The American Cancer Society saves lives by helping people stay well and taking steps to reduce their risk for cancer or detect it early. Learn how important lifestyle behaviors can help reduce your cancer risk at cancer.org/breastcancer.

  • To stay well and reduce your cancer risk, strive for at least 30 minutes of exercise in addition to your usual activities on 5 or more days each week.

  • To stay well and reduce your cancer risk, maintain a healthy body weight by eating a well-balanced diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Limit the amount of red meats you eat, especially high-fat and processed meats. Learn how delicious a healthy diet can be at cancer.org/EatHealthyGetActive.

  • Get help quitting smoking for yourself or a loved one, or join the fight against tobacco as an advocate for smoke-free communities at cancer.org/GreatAmericanSmokeout. In November, join the American Cancer Society for the Great American Smokeout®.

  • Want to learn ways to have more energy, feel better, and lower your stress level... all while helping to reduce your risk of cancer? Find activities to fit your lifestyle and get ideas for raising active kids at cancer.org/EatHealthyGetActive.

  • Don't think you have time for a workout? Many people don't know that they can benefit from small amounts of moderate activity throughout the day. Regular physical activity is easier to fit in than you may realize and can help lower your lifetime risk for cancer. To learn more, visit cancer.org/EatHealthyGetActive.

  • You can take charge of your health! Evidence suggests that one-third of all cancer deaths could be prevented with proper diet and exercise. Learn more at cancer.org/EatHealthyGetActive.

  • Obesity is the fastest growing health problem in the United States. Being overweight or obese can increase your risk of developing or dying from several diseases, including certain types of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Learn how to stay well and reduce your risk of cancer and other diseases at cancer.org/EatHealthyGetActive.

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